Upcoming Humanities Grant Events

march

19mar11:59 pmHumanities Grant Spring DeadlineEvent Type:Grant & Program Deadlines,Humanities Grants

For Humanities Grant Inquiries Contact

James Nelson
Director of Grants
jnelson “at” mihumanities.org

Help Support Michigan Humanities

Spring 2019 Humanities Grant Awards

1.) Akshara

Project Name: Rasa Festival of Performing Arts
Grant Request: $15,000
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

Akshara is hosting the Rasa Festival of Performing Arts, a series of performing arts events rooted in the traditions of South Asia, and given new expression in the flourishing Indian and Bangladeshi communities of Southeast Michigan. Rich in traditions of classical, folk, and ritual performing arts, these communities take pride in preserving and passing down these traditions to younger generations. We will showcase dance, music, and theater by master performers, community members across generations, invited and touring artists from India, and more, creating an open platform for inter-cultural understanding and dialogue, education, preservation of heritage, and continuation of tradition in new ways. Each event will feature lectures by scholars, discussions, video presentations, Q&A sessions, and demonstrations in order to present the cultural context and history, as well as their significance in the immigrant communities. There will also be panel discussions and audience participation forums to facilitate dialogue on the role of performing arts traditions in community building, recognizing cultural diversity, and the creation of identity.

2.) Cedar Tree Institute

Project Name: Water Rising
Grant Request:  $14,000
Region: Upper Peninsula

Project Summary: 

The year 2019 has been designated the “Gift of Water.” As part of our mission, the Cedar Tree Institute will present Water Rising as part of our on-going efforts in promoting water stewardship. Water Rising is a unique multi-genre collaboration that brings the humanities and arts together through writing and the visual arts, including music and video installation, to inspire viewers to engage their own sense of place. The goal is to help communities discover their own unique connection to place, deepening the personal sense of responsibility for stewardship of their cultural heritage and environment. A core idea behind the Water Rising collaboration is the awareness that stewardship begins with caring, and that caring begins with connection—we cannot save nature or heritage unless we find ways to connect with it. Water Rising programs, with a multi-genre approach linking art with science and the humanities, have been designed to increase accessibility for a wide range of viewers and participants, and to celebrate the diversity that makes up our American landscape.

3.) Detroit Educational Television

Project Name: Rihla: Arab Americans in Detroit
Grant Request:  $15,000
Region: Southeast/Nationwide

Project Summary: 

DPTV will produce, engage, and distribute video-based educational experiences that connect Arab American communities to other communities in Southeast Michigan through its “Detroit Performs” and “One Detroit” series. These combined efforts provide the region with a way to connect to the issues and people that define and illuminate the strengths of Detroit. DPTV is telling the story of the most important city in America, connecting four million metro-Detroiters through focused, objective news and thoughtful commentary. Rihla: Arab Americans in Detroit will underscore this vision by connecting DPTV’s audience to some of the largest, oldest, and most diverse Arab American communities in the United States.

4.) Detroit Historical Society

Project Name: Neighborhoods: Where Detroit Lives Oral History Project
Grant Request:  $14,500
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

The Detroit Historical Society’s award-winning Detroit 67: Looking Back to Move Forward was the catalyst for the organization’s newest oral history project, The Neighborhoods: Where Detroit Lives. The Detroit Historical Society is very intentional about reaching deep into Detroit neighborhoods to amplify and preserve the stories of those who would never have otherwise had a platform. Detroit’s neighborhoods are a rich mosaic—each with its own history and personality. The society’s Neighborhoods: Where Detroit Lives oral history project will focus on chronicling life in Detroit’s many neighborhoods by interviewing the people that make life in them. The project will follow established protocol for oral history collection, to record living people’s testimony about their own experiences, place them in an accurate historical context, and create a historical record. Specifically, the Neighborhoods: Where Detroit Lives project seeks to capture the history and identity of each neighborhood through the memories and experiences of its residents.

5.) Detroit Public Theatre

Project Name: Richard III-In Prison: A Critical Edition
Grant Request:  $15,000
Region: Southeast/Nationwide

Project Summary: 

Richard III-In Prison: A Critical Edition will be the first, in what we hope will be a series of critical editions, of Shakespeare’s plays to be edited and annotated by Shakespeare in Prison members old and new. This book will consist of the 2016–17 women ensemble’s 90-minute edit of the text, analytical footnotes in their words, and essays by those who worked on the play while incarcerated. The process will be guided by Shakespeare in Prison’s staff, but all contributions will be from ensemble members—mirroring the model we’ve used in prison for the past seven years.

6.) Detroit Women of Color

Project Name: Detroit Women of Color International Film Festival
Grant Request:  $11,069
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

Detroit Women of Color, Inc., will host the Fourth Annual Detroit Women of Color International Film Festival on September 27–29, 2019 at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. The primary goal of the festival is to integrate film, social justice, and collaboration to advance dialogue and community engagement to radically challenge oppressive systems and raise the voice of people color who are marginalized and ignored. Located in the heart of Detroit’s cultural center, the Museum of African American History provides an exceptional space for the festival, offering the Ford Freedom Rotunda, General Motors Theater, a multipurpose room, and classrooms to promote a more integrated experience for participants during the three-day weekend.

7.) Friends of Theodore Roethke Foundation

Project Name: Bringing the Past Home
Grant Request:  $14,354
Region: Mid-Michigan

Project Summary: 

Bringing the Past Home will bring Tess Gallagher and her writing colleague, Alice Derry, to visit Michigan in October to celebrate reading and writing with Michigan students. Beginning at Roethke House, the childhood home of Tess Gallagher’s poetry professor, Theodore Roethke, the two will offer writing workshops for Saginaw students and readings from and discussions about their latest publications before traveling to Michigan State University, Saginaw Valley State University, and University of Michigan campuses.

8.) Gilmore Car Museum

Project Name: Birth of the Automobile: Amish Buggy to Horseless Carriage
Grant Request:  $3,850
Region: Southwest/Statewide

Project Summary: 

Birth of the Automobile: Amish Buggy to Horseless Carriage will bring a small team of participants to transform an Amish horse-drawn buggy into a gasoline-powered horseless carriage that resembles a 1909 Holsman high wheel motor buggy. These two vehicles were selected because of the similarity of their design and the inherent logic of a transformation of a horse-drawn vehicle into a motorized vehicle. Selected components of the Amish buggy will be removed and then replaced with prebuilt components, which make the transformation possible. After the installation of all the necessary components, a small vintage gasoline powered engine will be installed in the buggy, the engine will be “timed” so that the four-cycles of the engine coincide with the spark plug firing. The car will be driven around the museum campus roads and all the participants can conclude that they “invented” a functional automobile just like Henry Ford.

9.) Grand Valley State University

Project Name: L’dor V’dor: Jewish Community of Michigan
Grant Request:  $11,628
Region: Southwest

Project Summary: 

L’dor V’dor: Jewish Community of Muskegon is a collaborative public history project documenting the congregational history of Temple B’nai Israel in Muskegon, Michigan, through an immersive exhibit opening in Fall of 2020 at the Lakeshore Museum Center in Muskegon. The project will document the histories and identities of a small congregation of reform Jews in West Michigan with the aim of providing the public with opportunities to engage in local history, cultural and religious identity within particular community spaces, and community dialogue around faith, education, and Jewish identity.

10.) Historical Society for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan

Project Name: Documentary of the Court and its History
Grant Request:  $15,000
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

The Historical Society will produce a 60-minute video documentary of the history of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan to educate students and Michigan residents about the history of the Eastern District, and the importance of the federal judicial system and the federal court in Detroit, Michigan.

The documentary, which supplements the Historical Society’s ongoing history of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, will include artifacts from the Historical Society’s collection, including photographs and video clips, voiceover narration, interviews with judges, attorneys, litigants, law professors, and historians. Reenactments of moments from significant cases are also being considered.

The documentary will consist of two principal segments. The first part will begin with an introduction of the federal judicial system, including how the court was established in the Eastern District and the physical buildings that have housed the court. This segment will also discuss the previous Detroit courthouse, the architecture of the current courthouse, the “million dollar” courtroom, and the courthouses stationed in Ann Arbor, Flint, and Port Huron. The second segment will highlight significant cases dating from the 1940s to the present.

11.) Hope College

Project Name: Little Read Lakeshore
Grant Request:  $15,000
Region: Southwest

Project Summary: 

The Little Read Lakeshore program will be a month-long community-wide reading program focused on the reading of one book that will take place during November 2019.

12.) Lawrence Technological University

Project Name: Humanity + Technology Lecture Series
Grant Request:  $6,800
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

The Humanity + Technology Lecture Series will consist of six public lectures or panels featuring recognized humanities scholars, who will share their work investigating the human implications and effects of technologies on individuals, societies, and cultures, in the past, present, and future. As a public outreach initiative designed to expand the audience for humanities research, our lectures bring humanistic knowledge to a broad and general audience, including high school students, business leaders, and community members.

As the only technological university in the Detroit metro region with deep ties to regional industry partnerships, Lawrence Technological University provides a unique platform for humanities scholars to communicate their expertise in interpreting, analyzing, and contextualizing the impact of technology on human communities. As LTU recruits and trains the next generation of engineers, architects, designers, and computer scientists, many of whom will work and live in Michigan, humanities has an essential role to play in the process, helping students, faculty, and citizens understand not just how technology works but why it matters.

13.) Michigan History Foundation

Project Name: Michigan Anishinaabe Heritage Program Planning and Development|
Grant Request:  $15,000
Region: Statewide

Project Summary: 

Michigan History Foundation will present the Michigan Anishinaabe Heritage Program, a new annual program that celebrates Michigan’s rich indigenous history and culture, past and present. The project, which will be managed by staff of the Michigan History Center in Lansing, involves convening a broad group of representatives from the state’s 12 federally-recognized and 2 state-recognized tribes and related organizations to collaboratively develop the goals, objectives, and deliverables. They will work with center staff to develop a small pilot program in September 2019, which will be evaluated against program goals and objectives. The group will then use the findings to revise and expand planning to develop large-scale annual indigenous history program, beginning in 2020 that will be held in conjunction with Michigan Indian Day each September.

14.) PuppetART

Project Name: Opportunity Southfield
Grant Request:  $9,900
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

Opportunity Southfield will address the issue of cultural engagement in our community. Any community must have a live theater for an exchange of culture and traditions. Bringing newcomers, especially children, to a theater to enjoy art and architecture is certainly one important way to build an audience. At PuppetART, we will bring arts and culture to the people of Southfield, and give them the opportunity to talk about it and participate in it. Puppets aren’t human, but Opportunity Southfield will use puppetry to bring the humanities closer to the people of Southfield.

15.) Underground Railroad Society of Cass County

Project Name: Underground Railroad Days
Grant Request: $12,000
Region: Southwest

Project Summary: 

The 10th Annual Underground Railroad Days is a three-day festival the second weekend in July that celebrates the history and legacy of the Underground Railroad in Cass County, Michigan. It is a collaboration between the Village of Vandalia and the Underground Railroad Society of Cass County (URSCC). There will be two aspects of the festival. URSCC sponsors and anchors the historic aspect with tours, presentations, exhibits, and reenactments pertaining to the UGRR.  The Village of Vandalia sponsors and anchors the family-oriented aspect, with kids’ events, a soul food dinner, an outdoor community church service and gospel sing, and more. UGRR Days will offer something for all ages. It is truly a community event that will draw visitors from all over the region, and showcase the humanities in drama, music, writing, reading, art, poetry, storytelling, lecture, living history reenactments, and more.

16.) Wild Swan Theatre

Project Name: Women Scientists Take the Stage
Grant Request:  $15,000
Region: Southeast

Project Summary: 

The centerpiece of the Women Scientists Take the Stage project will be an original production (title TBD) based on the life and work of world-renowned computer scientist, Margaret Hamilton. She was the lead software engineer on the team that developed in-flight software for the Apollo and Skylab programs. In 1969, she was credited with saving the Apollo 11 mission, the first landing of a human on the moon. We are delighted that Ms. Hamilton has committed to participating and contributing to this project. We will premiere this new production for fourth through eighth grade school audiences, families, and the general public at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor and Michigan Science Center in Detroit, during Women’s History Month in March 2020. We anticipate reaching over 4,000 children and families from southeastern Michigan.

By County

(for detail, see above)

Barry County

Gilmore Car Museum -Birth of the Automobile: Amish Buggy to Horseless Carriage, $3,850

A small team of participants will transform an Amish horse-drawn buggy into a gasoline-powered horseless carriage which resembles a 1909 Holsman highwheel motor buggy. The project results will be shared with students across Michigan.

Cass County

Underground Railroad Society of Cass County-Underground Railroad Days, $12,000

The 10th Annual Underground Railroad Days is a three day festival the second weekend in July that celebrates the history and legacy of the Underground Railroad in Cass County MI.

Ingham County

Michigan History Foundation-Michigan Anishinaabe Heritage Program Planning and Development, $15,000

Heritage Michigan will plan an annual program that celebrates Michigan’s rich indigenous history and culture, past and present.

Marquette County

Cedar Tree Institute-Water Rising, $14,000

Water Rising is a unique multi-genre collaboration that brings the humanities and arts together via writing and the visual arts, as well as through music and video installation to inspire viewers to engage their own sense of place.

Oakland County

Lawrence Technological University-Humanity + Technology Lecture Series, $6,800

The series will consist of 6 public lectures or panels featuring recognized humanities scholars, who will share their work investigating the human implications and effects of technologies past, present, and future.

PuppetART-Opportunity Southfield, $9,900

PuppetART will be conducting a series of shows and workshops in their new community of Soutfield.

Ottawa County

Grand Valley State University-L’dor V’dor: Jewish Community of Michigan, $11,628

L’dor V’dor: Jewish Community of Muskegon is a collaborative public history project documenting the congregational history of Temple B’nai Israel in Muskegon, Michigan through an immersive exhibit opening in Fall of 2020 at the Lakeshore Museum Center in Muskegon.

Hope College-Little Read Lakeshore, $15,000

The Little Read Lakeshore program will be a month-long community-wide reading program focused on the reading of one book that will take place during November 2019.

Saginaw County

Friends of Theodore Roethke Foundation-Bringing the Past Home, $14,354

Former Roethke student, Tess Gallagher and her writing colleague, Alice Derry, will visit Michigan in October to celebrate reading and writing with Michigan students.

Washtenaw County

Akshara-Rasa Festival of Performing Arts, $15,000

The Rasa Festival of Performing Arts is a series of performing arts events (dance, music, theater), rooted in the traditions of South Asia but being preserved, nurtured, and given new expressions in the flourishing Indian and Bangladeshi communities of SE Michigan.

Wild Swan Theater-Women Scientists Take the Stage, $15,000

An original piece to be based on the life and work of world-renowned computer scientist, Margaret Hamilton.

Wayne County

Detroit Educational Television Foundation-Rihla: Arab Americans in Detroit, $15,000

Rihla: Arab Americans in Detroit will connect DPTV’s audience to some of the largest, oldest and most diverse Arab American communities in the United States.

Detroit Historical Society-Neighborhoods: Where Detroit Lives Oral History Project, $14,500

The Neighborhoods: Where Detroit Lives oral history project seeks to capture the history and identity of Detroit’s neighborhoods through the memories and experiences of its residents.

Detroit Public Theatre-Richard III-In Prison: A Critical Edition, $15,000

Richard III—In Prison: A Critical Edition” will be the first in a series of critical editions of Shakespeare’s plays, edited and annotated by Shakespeare in Prison members old and new.

Detroit Women of Color-Detroit Women of Color International Film Festival $11,069

The Detroit Women of Color, Inc. will host the Fourth Annual Detroit Women of Color International Film Festival on September 27-29, 2018 at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit.

Historical Society for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan-Documentary of the Court and its History, $15,000

The Historical Society will produce a 60-minute video documentary of the history of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan to educate students and Michigan residents about the history of the Eastern District, and the importance of the federal judicial system and the federal court in Detroit, Michigan.

 

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